Private Edward Mauff, Co. A, 72nd Illinois Infantry, USA

1854

  • January 6: Almost 17-year-old Edward arrived in New York City via Argentina on the ship Westphalia.

1860

  • June 18: The U.S. Federal Census taken in West Creek, Lake County, IN showed Edward, a master shoe maker, and Amelia living with their 8 month old son Charles. Living in the household are other Mauff family members, perhaps siblings of Edward.

1862

  • July 25: Edward enlisted into the U.S. Army.
  • August 21: Edward mustered into Company A, 72 IL Infantry.

1864

  • November 30: Edward Mauff fought in the Battle of Franklin. He was positioned in the main line in front of the Carter family smoke house.

1865

  • August 7: Mustered out of the U.S. Army.

1867

  • Chicago, Illinois City Directory listed “Mauff E. boot and shoemaker.”

1870

  • July 1: The U.S. Federal Census taken in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois showed E. T., a shoe dealer, and Rosie living with their children: Charles, age 10, Josie, 2, Robert, 5 months. Also living with the family is a 14 year old girl named Alice Ramstein, possibly Rosalia’s sister.
  • Chicago City Business Directory lists E.T. Mauff as having a business at 259 Clark St.

1871

  • October 8- 10: The Great Chicago Fire destroyed over 3 square miles of Chicago’s central business district, including the shoe store owned by Edward Mauff.

    ***Btwn 1871 and 76 Edward Mauff registered for land in Colorado through the Homestead Act. ***

1876

  • Denver, Colorado City Directory listed “Mauff, Edward T.” as being a boot and shoemaker.

1880

  • June 7: The U.S. Federal Census taken on taken in Denver, Arapahoe County, Colorado showed Edward, a shoemaker, and Rosalie living with their children: Charles, age 20, Josephine, 11, Albert, 9, Augusta, 9 and Gertrude, 2.

1882

  • July 11: Article in the Indianapolis News.
  • ***Throughout 1879-1883 Edward Mauff went through many tribulations and trials. His wife attempted to have him institutionalized for his aggressive dangerous behaviors and he continually escapes from authorities and makes his way back home. Through his trials he was said to be a “very nice man” at times. He had bouts of extreme aggressive behavior, believing people to be after him. He would arm himself and say he needed to protect himself from those out to get him. He would exhibit odd behavior such as going into his yard and building fences only to tear them down once they were complete. He ended up being institutionalized permanently. He was incarcerated at the State Insane Asylum in Pueblo, Colorado***

1885

  • June 1: The Colorado State Census taken in Pueblo County, CO at the Insane Asylum showed inmate Ed Mauff, a shoemaker. He was listed as being “insane” on the census.

1900

  • June 8: The U.S. Federal Census taken in Denver, Arapahoe County, CO showed a widowed, Rosalie, a florist, living on her own. She states she was married for 51 years.

1914

  • May 27: Rosalie Mauff applied for a widows’ pension in California.