Private George W. Sill, Co. E, 118 Ohio Infantry, USA

1843

  • George W. Sill was born in Chester County, PA to Jeremiah and Mary Sill.

1860

  • June 4: The U.S. Federal Census enumerated in Union Township, Mercer County, OH showed 17-year-old George living with his parents and siblings. His father, Jeremiah, was a farmer.

1862

  • August 14: George enlisted in the U.S. Army and was mustered into Co. E, 118 OH Infantry, U.S.

War Years Biographical Sketch.
“The Siege of Knoxville was the first important battle in which Mr. Sill took part, and then rapidly followed Mossy Creek (in which 47 members of this regiment lost their lives), Rocky Face Ridge, Buzzard’s Roose, Resaca (in which battle the 118th lost 47 percent of those engaged). Lost Mountain, Pine Mountain, New Hope, Dallas and Kennesaw Mountain. Prior to the last mentioned battle. Mr. Sill had passed through all dangers unharmed; but in this battle, which took place on June 27, 1864 he was wounded in the right arm, and had seven bullet holes in his clothes. In this battle a brother was also killed who was a member of the 46th Regiment, Ohio Vol. Inf., under Captain Dunathan. After his recovery, Mr. Sill rejoined his regiment and was sent to the rear, later participating in the battles of Franklin and Nashville. From Nashville the regiment was sent to the North Carolina coast, where its good work was shown in its regimental colors being the first to float over the fortifications at Fort Anderson, and it entered the city of Wilmington on Washington’s birthday, 1865. Mr. Sill also took part in the fight at Kingston, North Carolina, after which his regiment joined General Sherman’s forces at oldsboro, followed Johnston to Raleigh and was present at the surrender of the Confederate general. Mr. Sill was honorably discharged from the service at Salisbury, North Carolina, June 14, 1865, and was mustered out at Cleveland on July 8, 1865, reaching home on the following day.” (History of Van Wert County and Representative Citizens, pg. 794-795)

1864

  • June 27: George was wounded at the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain.

  • November 30: George fought at the Battle of Franklin, his regiment the 118th OH was positioned at the fringe of the fighting along the western flank.

1865   

  • June 24: George mustered out of the U.S. Army.

  • December 21: George Sill married Elizabeth Slentz in Van Wert County, OH.

1870

  • July 11: George applied for and was granted a U.S. Military pension as an invalid.

  • July 28: The U.S. Federal Census enumerated in York Township, Van Wert County, OH showed George, a farmer, and Elizabeth living with their young daughter. Living on the same property were George’s parents and younger siblings.

1880

  • June 7: The U.S. Federal Census enumerated in York Township, Van Wert County, OH showed George, a farmer, and Elizabeth living with their daughters.

1890

  • June: George was enumerated on the Veterans Schedule of the U.S. Census.

1896  

  • January 7: Akron Daily Democrat, Akron, OH reported George was nearly gored to death.

Akron_Daily_Democrat_Tue__Jan_7__1896_.jpg
  • January 24: The Daily Herald, Delphos, OH.

The_Daily_Herald_Fri__Jan_24__1896_.jpg

1900

  • June 28: The U.S. Federal Census enumerated in York Township, Van Wert County, OH showed George, a farmer, living with his wife Elizabeth.

1902

  • August 18: Delphos Daily Herald, Delphos, OH.

Delphos_Daily_Herald_Mon__Aug_18__1902_.jpg

1910

  • May 13: The U.S. Federal Census enumerated in York Township, Van Wert County, OH showed George, a farmer, living with his wife Elizabeth.

1920  

  • January 28: The U.S. Federal Census enumerated in York Township, Van Wert County, OH showed George, a farmer, living with his wife Elizabeth.

1923

 source: findagrave.com

source: findagrave.com

  • September 2: George W. Sill died in Van Wert County, OH. He was buried at Mendon Cemetery in Mercer County, OH.

  • October 11: George’s widow Elizabeth applied for and was granted a U.S. Military pension as a widow.

Biographical Sketch of George W. Sill

History of Van Wert County and Representative Citizens, pg. 794-795

“George W. Sill, one of the pioneer settles of York township, where he owns one of the best farms and finest residences in the southeastern section of the county, was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1843, and is a son of Jeremiah and Mary H. (Fryer) Sill.

Both parents of our esteemed subject were born in Pennsylvania and were probably of German extraction. In 1848 they located at Pittsburg, during the period of the construction of the Pennsylvania Railroad. In 1855 Jeremiah Sill moved to Washington County, Ohio, by way of the canal, and two years later to Mercer County.

George W. Sill was 14 years of age when he accompanied his parents to Mercer County. His educational opportunities were meager, but long association with people and participation in notable public events have instructed him more than year of attendance in the school room. He accepted inevitable conditions and, to the limit of his strength, assisted his father.

The land which Mr. Sill and his father had purchased was a totally unimproved tract, swampy to a degree and heavily wooded. He married late in 1865, and built a round log house on the land, 18 by 24 feet in dimensions, and settled in it on April 16, 1866; his neighbors assisted him in rolling the logs for this dwelling. He immediately set about improving the place, his beginning being the digging of open ditches for drainage, this long preceding the extensive tiling which he has since done. In 1856 he built a log stable, which he replaced in 1877 by a good frame barn. In 1902 this was destroyed by fire, and with its contents. It was immediately rebuilt, with dimensions of 62 by 38 feet. The family continued to reside in the log house until 1885, when a fine modern residence was built, after plans made by Mr. Sill. It is fitted with equipments for comfort which one only looks for in a city home.

Mr. Sill has carried on general farming, and has raised many horses and cattle, and a great deal of stock. In 1893 a test drill was made on his land for oil, and it was found that oil flowed freely 50 feet above the derrick, the well producing 250 barrels a day. It was drilled in November and kept up a fine flow for several months. The following April it was producing 75 barrels per day. There are now three producing wells on the place, and gas is produced in a sufficient quantity for domestic purposes. This farm is considered the model one of York Township

In December, 1865, Mr. Sill was married to Elizabeth Slentz, who is a daughter of Eli and Mary Ann Slentz…. Both Mr. and Mrs. Sill are most highly esteemed by all who know them, and they are especial objects of love and veneration among the young people of the church.

Mr. and Mrs. Sill have two daughters and an adopted daughter. These are Rebecca Elizabeth, Mary Euthema and the daughter of David Hughes. Their home has always been one open to religious worship, and on many occasions conversions have taken place there. They are passing the evening of life surrounded by all that is calculated to make this season most enjoyable.”